LCSClogoStartling as the facts may be, only 16% of lung cancers are diagnosed at their earliest, most curable stages. However, if caught early, patients can increase their treatment options, outcome and survival rate. Recent efforts from the National Cancer Institute aim to change survival rates. Their eight year trial, the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), of 53,000 smokers and ex-smokers has shown that using CT for screening of lung cancer instead of a chest X-ray has reduced cancer deaths from lung cancer by 20% over just five years.

Patients to benefit from screening LDCT for Lung Cancer (High Risk Patients)

Beneficiary eligibility criteria (All of the following criteria must be met)

Cost
SJIA will bill the patient’s insurance. However, if their insurance does not cover the exam, the payment will be the patient’s responsibility. Medicare will cover annual screenings for those that meet the criteria. If there are abnormal findings on the initial exam, and follow up procedures are required, they will need to be approved by the patient’s insurer.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between LDCT and a regular CT of the chest? LDCT significantly reduces the radiation exposure to the patient compared to a standard CT

Why don’t I always get LDCT? Although the radiation dose is reduced, the image quality is slightly inferior to a standard CT. The image quality is adequate for the purpose of screening for lung cancer but not as good for other diseases of the chest

Do I need to get contrast through an IV in my arm? NO

How long does this test take? 10 minutes

If the results state that there are abnormal findings on my exam does that mean I have lung cancer? One out of every three patients will likely have findings on the CT scan that may require additional follow up. The vast majority of these findings will not turn out to be cancer. 

Who should I contact if I have any questions after the exam? Contact your primary physician. The complete report will be sent to the primary physician provided by you before the exam. The report will contain not only all the findings from the exam, but also recommendation for follow up. Your physician will need to be involved in ordering any additional tests.

How much does a LDCT cost? SJIA will bill the patient’s insurance. However, if their insurance does not cover the $190 exam, the payment will be the patient’s responsibility. Medicare will cover annual screenings for those that meet the criteria. If there are abnormal findings on the initial exam, and follow up procedures are required, they will need to be approved by the patient’s insurer.

For questions about LDCT or to schedule an exam: Call 315-452-2004.

PET/CT scanning has been located at North Medical Suite 2C since November 2000. We have done more than 19,000 exams in that time. PET/CT detects metabolic activity within cancer cells – which by nature are highly metabolic- providing vital information about the cells’ function. The scanner is used primarily in the management and detection of cancer, but is also available for the evaluation of patients with certain neurological and cardiac conditions.
 
Why is PET/CT important?
Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a unique imaging modality that is capable of detecting specific diseases at an early stage. A PET scan will provide information that can be used for the planning and management of your care, as well as determining therapy and monitoring your progress. The combination of PET and CT allows radiologists and physicians to use the benefits of both modalities to ensure they have the most accurate information to manage your care.

How is PET/CT used?
PET/CT is utilized in:
Oncology |  to determine the location and severity of a tumor’s growth
Neurology |  to aid in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia, strokes, brain tumors, and seizures.
 
What do I need to tell the scheduler?
When scheduling your PET/CT scan, inform the imaging staff if:

How do I prepare for my scan?
Fast after midnight before your appointment. Diabetic patients will be given special instructions.
All scheduled patients will receive a phone call prior to the day o the appointment. We will discuss instructions for the test and answer questions.

Upon arrival at the PET/CT office
Medical history and any prior PET or PET/CT exams will be reviewed. Blood sugar may be checked, and an imaging tracer called Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) will be administered by way of injection. A one hour resting period will be required before the scanning begins. This resting period is necessary for the FDG to be distributed throughout your body.

At the time of PET/CT scanning
You will be positioned on the scan table.The table will be moved into a large opening in the PET/CT scanner. You will be asked to lie still while the PET/CT scanner acquires the images. The time of the scans varies, but will typically range form 20-30 minutes.

Upon PET/CT scan completion
A technologist will process the computer images. The reading physician will interpret these images. A report will be generated and forwarded to your referring physician.

To schedule or call with questions: 315-452-2666
Fax: 315-452-2669

Nuclear Medicine procedures provide information about the anatomy of the body and the function of its organs. When you undergo a nuclear medicine scan, a chemical compound, which contains a small amount of a radioactive material, is administered by an injection in the arm.

After the administration of the compound, the nuclear medicine scans can be performed either immediately, or after a circulation period. The circulation time varies depending on the area being studied.

A special detector, called a gamma camera, is used to image the body part being studied. The camera does not produce radiation, it simply detects the radioactive compound that was injected. This is collected by a computer and a digital image is produced that can be manipulated and stored onto film. Our Nuclear Medicine Technologists are registered and must maintain their registry through continuing education.

To better examine the internal structures of your reproductive system you may be referred for a transvaginal ultrasound. This examination is performed by inserting a transducer into the vagina. The transducer sends reflected sound waves to a computer, which will reconstruct your organs to identify areas of concern. The exam is painless and generally takes approximately 30 minutes. There is no preparation for this exam.

A Doppler vascular ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to obtain a medical image or picture of blood flow through various vessels in the body. Vascular ultrasound produces precise images and measurements of many blood vessels in the body. It is commonly used to image the carotid artery in the neck, or arteries and veins in legs and arms. It can detect diseased vessels and identify a wide variety of changing conditions, enabling your doctor to make a quick and accurate diagnosis.

A mammogram is special low-dose X-ray of the breast. Our radiologist uses the images to detect breast cancer, ideally as early as two years before a lump can be felt. Digital mammography has become the gold standard for breast cancer screening and is one of the most recent advances for breast cancer detection. Current guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) recommend screening mammographies every year for women, beginning at age 40.

Request your digital mammogram for all the right reasons:

Screening Mammogram
If performed annually as recommended, screening mammography is the key to detecting breast cancer early and saving lives. Women who are 40 years of age and older with no symptoms of breast disease should schedule their screening mammogram appointments annually.
A physician referral is not required for this exam, however, the physician can request that the patient be seen in office prior to
the exam.

Diagnostic Mammogram
While a screening mammogram is encouraged each year for women who do not have significant breast symptoms, a physician may order a diagnostic mammogram if the patient is experiencing a worrisome lump, changes in the breast skin, pain, nipple discharge, or if they have a personal history of breast cancer. Diagnostic mammography may also be performed if the screening mammogram demonstrates a possible abnormality. The type and number of mammographic views taken will be customized to the patient’s situation. A diagnostic mammogram is not considered a preventive care service by most insurance companies. This exam may be subject to deductibles and co-insurance, so we suggest the patient contact their insurance provider with coverage questions. There is no preparation for
this exam.

These exams are performed at all of our locations.

Ultrasound is the use of sound waves to image an unborn fetus as well as the liver, kidney, breast and other soft tissues. A specialized transducer allows for exams involving blood flow. The transducer converts electrical impulses into bursts of high frequency sound waves. These sound waves are directed into the body over organs or structures of interest. When ultrasound waves strike these structures they are reflected back to the transducer just as your voice echoes back when you shout into a cavern.

The reflected sound waves are converted by the transducer back into electrical impulses that are analyzed by a computer. The computer uses this information to construct an image or picture of the organ.

Our ultrasonographers are all certified specialists who must maintain a “registered” status through continuing education.

PREPARATION
Drink 32oz. of water 2 hours before the study, and do not empty your bladder.

Ultrasound is the use of sound waves to image an unborn fetus as well as the liver, kidney, breast and other soft tissues. A specialized transducer allows for exams involving blood flow. The transducer converts electrical impulses into bursts of high frequency sound waves. These sound waves are directed into the body over organs or structures of interest. When ultrasound waves strike these structures they are reflected back to the transducer just as your voice echoes back when you shout into a cavern.

The reflected sound waves are converted by the transducer back into electrical impulses that are analyzed by a computer. The computer uses this information to construct an image or picture of the organ.

Our ultrasonographers are all certified specialists who must maintain a “registered” status through continuing education.

PREPARATION:
Nothing to eat or drink after midnight or 6 hours prior to the study.

Ductograms are performed on patients with active nipple discharge. The breast will be manipulated to produce the discharge in the examination room, thereby identifying the specific duct. A needle is then inserted into the duct and contrast material is injected. Mammography images are then taken as the contrast material will highlight the specific duct and assist the radiologist in identifying abnormalities.

There is no preparation for this exam however there needs to be active discharge.

Biopsies are the only definitive way to confirm if breast tissue is benign or cancerous. Abnormalities are examined further by having a sample of tissue, cells or fluid extracted for evaluation in a laboratory.

If you will be having surgical removal in an operating room we will “localize” the area for your surgeon. Mammographic images or ultrasound guidance will be performed to identify the exact location of the area to be biopsied. When this has been completed, the radiologist will insert a needle into the breast, into the lesion/nodule. Additional mammographic images will then be obtained to verify the needle is in satisfactory position for you to proceed to the operating room for surgical removal of the area.